Julian Peterson Traded

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Posted by: Shaun Dolence

The Seattle Seahawks have reportedly traded linebacker Julian Peterson to the Detroit Lions for defensive tackle Cory Redding and a fifth-round draft pick.

Julian Peterson, who will turn 31 in July, refused to restructure his contract to stay in Seattle and a trade or release was imminent. The contract that Peterson signed with the Seahawks in 2006 runs through 2012, and calls for a salary of $6.5 million in 2009; Peterson would’ve counted $8.8 million against the cap in 2009. Trading Peterson saves the Seahawks around $4.6 on the cap next year, and will reportedly allow the Seahawks to avoid over $30 million in salary obligations over the next four seasons.

Redding: Excellent character, strong work ethic.

Instead of cutting the aging linebacker, Tim Ruskell sold high and traded him to the Lions for Redding and the first pick in the fifth round. Cory Redding is a versatile lineman who can play either end or tackle, and was willing to restructure his contract (seven-year deal worth $49 million, signed in 2007) to make the trade feasible.

Due to injuries suffered on Detroit’s defensive line in 2006, Redding was moved from defensive end to defensive tackle, where he played the “three” technique spot. He prospered in 11 starts at the new position, totaling 8 sacks and 47 tackles that season.

The following year, after a rough off-season of contract negotiations and a franchise tag, Redding’s play fell off. He performed well at times, but did not appear to be the same player from the previous season, and recorded just one sack. Redding’s attitude towards the Lions organization was rather bitter, and his performance suffered.

Redding utilizes great quickness, foot agility, and balance to penetrate gaps.

Last year, Redding played in and started 13 games, recording 3 sacks. His season ended on December 12th when he was placed on the injured reserve with injuries to his knee and groin. If Redding can recover from his injuries, he should return to his dominant form in 2006; a defensive tackle with a strong work ethic and motor that plays with violence, quickness, and brute strength. He’ll likely start as the under tackle on the defensive line opposite Mebane or Cole (at the nose tackle), but we’ll have to wait and see how the roster shakes up.

From a scouting report in 2007 by Tom Kowalski, Lions blogger at mlive.com:

What separates Redding from other tackles who can match him in either size, strength or speed is Redding’s relentless attack play after play. His work ethic is strong and his game-day motor is ruthless.

With such a strong work ethic, high energy, relentless motor, Redding is obviously a Tim Ruskell player. Rod Marinelli, former Detroit head coach, seems to agree:

He brings one of the hardest things to find: a motor. (He is) a guy who will play every snap full speed, all-out, every snap, sideline to sideline.

I love this move. Instead of cutting Peterson and receiving nothing in return, we’re able to find a trading partner and acquire another defensive lineman to fit our rotation. Not to mention that Tim finally gets his hands on a draft choice in the fifth round, which Seattle lost in the Colbert trade with Denver. What do you think, 12th Man?

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Tags: Brandon Mebane Colin Cole Cory Redding Detroit Lions Julian Peterson Keary Colbert Rod Marinelli Seattle Seahawks Tim Ruskell

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