Ten Reasons Why Jim Mora Was Fired

I’m probably in the minority; I didn’t necessarily think Jim Mora should’ve been fired following Seattle’s miserable 2009 campaign. To be fair, I thought Mora should’ve had another opportunity to right the ship. And honestly, I thought the front office and ownership agreed with me.

I guess not. But it isn’t like I haven’t been wrong before.

I’m sure Jim Mora is a great guy off the field. In a tough business like the National Football League, however, positive results must be achieved on the field to retain jobs. Now that Mora is out, I’m completely behind whatever Paul Allen has up his sleeve (so far, so good). I’m for anything that will make the Seahawks competitive again.

Looking back, this past season was an absolute joke. We thought heads would roll, and they have.  Even though I am was a Jim Mora supporter, I’ve gotta be honest.

Here are the top ten reasons why he lost his job as head coach of the Seattle Seahawks:

It isn’t easy to follow a legend.

Mike Holmgren is a Hall of Fame coach who helped the Seattle Seahawks achieve more than fans ever thought possible. He brought Seattle to its first Super Bowl and was a staple in the city for over a decade. Now, imagine being the guy who is supposed to take his place. Those are pretty big shoes to fill.

Don’t forget, the Seahawks WERE 5-11.

After a miserable season in the National Football League, no one’s job is secure. In a “what have you done for me lately?” environment, this decision shouldn’t have shocked any of us.  An undefeated preseason isn’t enough to keep a coaching gig in the NFL.

And it didn’t look like things were going to get any better.

The Seahawks didn’t improve at all, and most of the season was an absolute failure. After watching the Seahawks get outscored 123-37 during the last four games of the season, the 12th Man was left pretty hopeless moving forward.

Veteran loyalty is overrated.

I understand that being loyal to your experienced players is important, but what if your veterans are noticeably inferior options? Why did Julius Jones continue to receive carries instead of Justin Forsett? Several players were overused while more youthful and capable players waited on the sidelines. Sometimes this was frustrating to witness.

Loyalty, Part two.

Greg Knapp and Jim Mora have a good working relationship and a long history together, but was a post-season evaluation even necessary? Mora should’ve relieved this guy of his duties a long time ago. That is, of course, assuming that Hugh Millen knows what he is talking about. Seattle’s offense became a joke, and Knapp is the one who should’ve been held accountable.

Post-game optimism.

I don’t think I could stomach listening to another post-game press conference with Jim Mora following a loss. I’ll pass on watching the Jim Mora Show following the game on Sundays. Even after embarrassing blowouts, Jim would applaud his team’s effort and point to signs of improvement, even when it was obvious the team was getting worse every week. I don’t want guys who try; I want guys who win.

Post-game, Part two.

How many times did Jim Mora use press conferences as an outlet to hold players accountable? Kickers shouldn’t cost the team games, more effort is needed, there need to be more “dirt-bags” on the offensive line. To be fair, we don’t know what actually happened in the locker room or behind closed doors. But I’d rather you just save that stuff for private and change the behavior by next Sunday.

The inmates were running the asylum.

As the season came to an end, it appeared as if the players had lost respect for the coaching staff. There was an obvious rift between coaches and players. You know it was getting bad when some of the players began to question the plays being called on the field. I mean, come on; could you even imagine T.J. Houshmandzadeh pouting on the sidelines and/or yelling into the face of Mike Holmgren?

No presence on the sidelines.

Did you ever watch Mora wander around on the sidelines? He looked like a small child lost in public. With his arms folded, he quietly gazed into nowhere wondering why his team was down by two scores in the first quarter. The only time Mora ever showed any real emotion was when the referees made a questionable call – then the pouting began.

Jim Mora was Tim Ruskell’s coach.

None of us wanted to see Mike Holmgren leave. But Tim Ruskell was alright with the decision to move forward because he had hand-selected a replacement: Jim Mora Jr. After several seasons under Ruskell’s watch, there is not a playmaker on offense, the offensive line is without depth, and the defense still gives up too many points. We should’ve known he was going to pick a “great” coach.

Topics: General Manager, Greg Knapp, Hall Of Fame, Head Coach, Jim Mora, Jim Mora Jr., Julius Jones, Justin Forsett, Mike Holmgren, National Football League, Offensive Coordinator, Paul Allen, Seattle Seahawks, Super Bowl, T.J. Houshmandzadeh, Tod Leiweke, Top Ten Reasons, Veteran

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  • Mike

    Mora was fired because he was, is and always has been a horrible coach. He should never have been given a shot at the job following Holmgren. He had the defensive backfield for two seasons. Did it get better or worse? For that ineptitude he got PROMOTED? Should’ve never gone through the charade vis a vis Holmgren/Mora, should have just let Mike go and then thrown a buttload of cash at Chucky or “The Chin.” Either would have added some much needed toughness to a Seahawks squad that, let’s face it, doesn’t scare anyone anymore that a troupe of girl scouts does.

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