Seahawks “Front Runners” to Acquire Brandon Marshall


Remember Nate Burleson’s tweet about Brandon Marshall? After his remarks on Twitter, even the most casual Seahawks fans started to believe the rumors:

I heard about Brandon Marshall possible coming hear but I won’t believe til I see it. He is a monster though!

I agree: Brandon Marshall is a monster.

He stands 6’4″ and weighs 230 pounds. He has 307 catches, 3,710 yards, and 23 touchdowns the past three seasons. And he is only 25 years old.

Sure, Marshall has been disgruntled in Denver – his prima donna status is pretty typical of a premier NFL wide receiver. But after watching high-character athletes combine for nine wins in two seasons, I’m ready for an infusion of new talent. If that means acquiring a disgruntled, me-first wide receiver, then so be it.

Marshall is a playmaker; we haven’t had his sort of talent in Seattle in years. He is a clear-cut number one receiver, and his arrival would increase the performance of other players around him. There are still a lot of other problems with Seattle’s offense, but acquiring Marshall wouldn’t be a step in the wrong direction.

Given Marshall’s productivity and value, however, acquiring him won’t be easy. Denver probably won’t  accept anything less than a first-round pick.

And no, Seahawks fans: Denver doesn’t want Deion Branch, Patrick Kerney, or any other underperforming Seattle players.

I would be ecstatic about obtaining a receiver like Marshall, but not for a first-round pick. There are too many holes to fill, and there are excellent prospects available who would fill greater needs. If you’re going to target a skilled position, would you rather have C.J. Spiller at 14th overall or Brandon Marshall? I understand that Marshall is a proven commodity, but wouldn’t you be excited about acquiring a talent like Spiller (think Chris Johnson)?

Marshall’s size is attractive and his production has been incredible, but even a “proven” wide receiver is no sure-thing.

Remember when Dallas traded first-, third-, and sixth-round picks to acquire wide receiver Roy Williams? Williams led the NFC in receiving in 2006 with 1,310 yards. In Dallas, Williams has played in 25 games and caught only 57 passes for 794 yards and eight touchdowns.

What about when the Cowboys splurged for Joey Galloway? Dallas gave the Seahawks two first-round picks for the disgruntled wide receiver; in Dallas, Galloway was never the player the front office envisioned and never had a 1,000-yard season. The two first-round picks given to Seattle? Shaun Alexander and Koren Robinson (the pick in 2001 was traded to San Francisco and used to select Andre Carter, but the Seahawks ended up with Robinson).

The Oakland Raiders thought it would be a good idea to send first- and seventh-round picks to Minnesota in exchange for wide receiver Randy Moss. Moss wasn’t terrible in Oakland, but he barely made it over 1,000 yards only once. And the Oakland Raiders also had to part with linebacker Napoleon Harris. Two years later, Moss was disgruntled again and the Raiders only received a fourth-round pick from New England as compensation.

When you hear rumors about the Seahawks interest in Brandon Marshall, proceed with caution: even the talented Marshall is no sure thing. If Seattle does acquire the troubled wide receiver, I’ll be happy – but only if the cost is no greater than a second-round draft pick.

Pay close attention, because according to Bill Williamson of ESPN.com, the Seahawks are “front runners” to land Marshall:

Seattle: This may be the front runner to land the receiver. The Seahawks have players to trade and Marshall would like to reunite with former Denver assistant coach Jeremy Bates, who is now Seattle’s offensive coordinator.

Tags: Brandon Marshall C.J. Spiller Deion Branch Denver Broncos Jeremy Bates Nate Burleson NFL Draft Patrick Kerney Prima Donna Pro Bowl Seattle Seahawks Trade Wide Receiver

  • Maxmilian

    You know it would be so fun to see Marshall play in Seattle, so so fun – I mean just youtube the guy! He’s amazing! But that said I really hope we don’t do it.

    In order to get this guy we’re going to have to pay big. Maybe we don’t have to give up the 6th pick – maybe – but we’d definitely have to part with the 14th. Is Marshall better than who we’d get at 14? Most likely. But the thing is, I want Seattle to one day field a great team, and signing Marshall doesn’t help us do that.

    Great teams mature together. Great teams have a core of players that have played together for a few years and are near or in their primes. Our line is in shambles, we have nothing close to a feature back, and Hasselbeck is too old to be relied on for more than two years max (love him but probably less). If we acquired Marshall we would basically be sacrificing crucial picks to get a WR that we can’t make use of fully. He will sit around, probably complaining, while we lose more because we don’t have a line, quarterback, and running backs to put around him. I believe that once Marshall realizes the Hasselbeck era is soon to end he will begin to become restless. I think that in the time it takes to acquire the players we need to start winning again he will likely have demanded a trade elsewhere. Everyone knows, the only thing that keeps a headache player like Marshall quiet is winning.

    In my opinion, our offense is not one gifted receiver away from becoming great. We need a lot of work – “WIN NOW” cannot be the mantra for this organization. We need to slow down and rebuild. Marshall does not help us do that.

    Of course, that’s just my opinion…

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